In 2015 Kansas had 6.3 million cattle on ranches and in feedyards (third highest in the nation). That's a little over twice the state's human population of more than 2.9 million!

See full fact

The cotton gin first came to Kansas in 1854 when a Polish immigrant wanted to gin local cotton near Valley Falls.

See full fact

One Kansas farmer raises enough food to feed about 155 people!

See full fact

Looking for a gluten-free grain? Try sorghum! It's gluten-free and packed with protein, iron, vitamin B-6, niacin, magnesium and phosphorus.  

See full fact

One dairy cow can produce more than 3,000 gallons of milk in a year. There are about 160,000 dairy cows in Kansas. That's a lot of milk!

See full fact

The majority of oil used for cooking in our country is U.S.-grown 100% soybean oil!

See full fact

One cowhide can produce enough leather to make 20 footballs, 18 soccer balls, 18 volleyballs or 12 basketballs.

See full fact

In 2016 Kansas farmers will harvest 264 million bushels of grain sorghum off 2.9 million acres.  That’s a 91 bushel average, up 3 bushels per acre from last year.

See full fact

Grain sorghum is one of the oldest known grains. Its origins can be traced back to ancient Africa and India.

See full fact

Compared with 50 years ago, pig farmers are using 41% less water to produce a pound of pork, with a 35% smaller carbon footprint.

See full fact

Enriched white bread and other enriched grain products are a good source of iron and B vitamins (thiamin, riboflavin, niacin and folic acid), as well as complex carbohydrates.

See full fact

Mexico and Japan are our top international corn buyers. They buy 50 percent of U.S. corn exports.

See full fact

About a third of a steer is used for beef production. The rest of the animal is used to make by-products found in medicines, cosmetics, detergents, insulation, and much more!

See full fact

In addition to meat, pigs provide us with lots of other products, including valves for human heart surgery, suede for shoes and clothing, and gelatin for many food and non-food uses.

See full fact

A common ingredient in fertilizer is phosphate, which comes from ancient sea life. Phosphate is one of many natural ingredients used to keep soil — and plants! — healthy.

See full fact

The largest market for field corn is to provide feed for animals like cattle, pigs, chicken, and even catfish. 

See full fact

Gluten-free grains have no caloric advantage over grains containing gluten like wheat, barley and rye. All carbohydrates have four calories per gram. Gluten-free foods are often higher in fat and...

See full fact

There are four main types of sorghum: grain, forage, biomass and sweet. Their most popular uses are: for food (grain sorghum), as livestock feed (forage sorghum), to produce bioenergy (biomass...

See full fact

Kansas is known for its sunflowers. They provide food for insects, birds and cattle, and make great cooking oil, biofuel and a delicious snack for people!

See full fact

Did you know there are 15,000 soybean farms in Kansas? In 2016, Kansas farmers harvested more than 4 million acres of soybeans.

See full fact

Cotton can be found in much more than clothes and other fabrics! Cotton by-products can be used to make paper currency, cosmetics and feed for dairy cattle and livestock.

See full fact