Small engines like lawnmowers and boats can use E10 fuel.

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Did you know there are 15,000 soybean farms in Kansas? In 2016, Kansas farmers harvested more than 4 million acres of soybeans.

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Sows give birth (called farrowing) to an average of eight to twelve piglets at a time and will raise six to eight litters of piglets in their lifetime.

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Looking for a gluten-free grain? Try sorghum! It's gluten-free and packed with protein, iron, vitamin B-6, niacin, magnesium and phosphorus.  

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In pre-refrigeration days, hogs were harvested in the fall and cured for six to seven months, just in time for Easter dinner. That’s how ham came to be the traditional Easter favorite.

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The United States grows more soybeans than any other country and six out of every ten rows of soybeans are exported to other countries.

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Soybean oil is a great source of omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin E.

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From farm to processor to distribution and retail, dairy creates jobs that support the economic well-being of Kansans. The dairy industry contributes $592 million annually to the Kansas economy and...

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Compared with 50 years ago, pig farmers are using 41% less water to produce a pound of pork, with a 35% smaller carbon footprint.

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It takes five to six months for a pig to reach market weight (about 265 pounds). One market hog provides about 160 pounds of pork for the grocery store’s meat case.

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2016 was a record year for Kansas corn. We produced 699 million bushels, topping the previous record set in 2009 by 17 percent!

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Enriched white bread and other enriched grain products are a good source of iron and B vitamins (thiamin, riboflavin, niacin and folic acid), as well as complex carbohydrates.

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Grain sorghum is one of the oldest known grains. Its origins can be traced back to ancient Africa and India.

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There are four main types of sorghum: grain, forage, biomass and sweet. Their most popular uses are: for food (grain sorghum), as livestock feed (forage sorghum), to produce bioenergy (biomass...

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One cowhide can produce enough leather to make 20 footballs, 18 soccer balls, 18 volleyballs or 12 basketballs.

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Kansas grows winter wheat that is planted and sprouts in the fall, becomes dormant in the winter, grows again in the spring and is harvested in early summer.

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Gluten-free grains have no caloric advantage over grains containing gluten like wheat, barley and rye. All carbohydrates have four calories per gram. Gluten-free foods are often higher in fat and...

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In 2015 Kansas had 6.3 million cattle on ranches and in feedyards (third highest in the nation). That's a little over twice the state's human population of more than 2.9 million!

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Mexico and Japan are our top international corn buyers. They buy 50 percent of U.S. corn exports.

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Gluten is what helps bread expand while the dough rises, and hold its shape while baking and after it cools. It’s also what makes bread chewy.

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The largest market for field corn is to provide feed for animals like cattle, pigs, chicken, and even catfish. 

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